Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDziadkowiec, Oliwieren_US
dc.contributor.authorVu, Chi C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShagott, Todd P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReinhart, Crystalen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeele-Lien, Ashleeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwink, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeissen, Gregory J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWituk, Scott A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHymer, Kimberlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBanta, Adrienneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-19T21:48:19Z
dc.date.available2009-11-19T21:48:19Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationDziadkowiec, Oliwier, Vu, Connie, Shagott, Todd, Reinhart, Crystal, Keele-Lien, Ashlee, Swink, Nathan Adrienne Banta,Kimberly Hymer, Scott Wituk and Greg Meissen(2009). Member Retention in Consumer-Run Organizations. In Proceedings: 5th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 92-93en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/2295
dc.descriptionPaper presented to the 5th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, May 1, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionResearch completed at Center for Community Support and Research/Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.description.abstractConsumer run-organizations (CROs) have been empowering and socially supportive settings chosen by mental health consumers as a complement or an alternative to traditional mental health services. According to previous research the benefits of actively attending and participating in CROs included increased social support, empowerment, and sense of community (2, 6 &13). This poster will present findings from one of few longitudinal studies of mental health consumers in consumer-operate organizations in the United States. Results of this study will focus on the predictive relationship between age, hope, organizationally mediated empowerment, personal empowerment, empowerment-decision making, social participation, socialnetwork as related to member retention . Face-to faces interviews were conducted with CRO members from eight different Kansas CROs at baseline (N=172) and at a 12-month follow up (N=171). Discussion will focus on the reasons why some mental health consumers might be more likely than other mental health consumers to become long time CRO members and how should CROs use this information to ensure their longevity.en_US
dc.format.extent131124 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University. Graduate Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.5en_US
dc.titleMember retention in consumer-run organizationsen_US
dc.typeConference paperen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record