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dc.contributor.authorShaaban, Ramy
dc.contributor.authorRichburg, Cynthia M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-06T16:00:56Z
dc.date.available2022-04-06T16:00:56Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-03
dc.identifier.citationShaaban, R., &; Richburg, C. M. (2021, December 19). Examining audiology students' clinical collaboration skills when using Virtual Audiology Cases Aided with no collaboration, live collaboration, and virtual collaboration. ASHA Wire. Retrieved April 6, 2022, from https://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2021_AJA-21-00052en_US
dc.identifier.issn1059-0889
dc.identifier.issn1558-9137
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1044/2021_AJA-21-00052
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/22823
dc.descriptionOpen Access PDF. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The purpose of this study was to examine students' ability to use effective clinical collaboration online in a designed scaffolded environment. Three groups were formed to achieve this goal: two control groups (one using no collaboration and one using live, face-to-face collaboration) and one treatment group using virtual collaboration. Method: A quasi-experimental design was conducted at two U.S. universities to examine whether there is a significant difference in clinical reasoning skills between three treatment groups using IUP Audiosim software. Two computer-based audiology case simulations were developed, and participants were randomly placed into the three groups. The clinical reasoning data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc analyses. Results: The results indicated that there was a significant difference in clinical reasoning skills between the three treatment groups. The score obtained by the no-collaboration group was significantly less than the scores obtained by the virtual and live collaboration groups. Conclusions: The results imply that lower scores were associated with students receiving more instructor-designed content and higher scores with students receiving less instructor-designed content. Students who received more scaffolds with the collaborations may have demonstrated better decision-making outside the training exercise than those who did not receive scaffolds. However, lower scores on the exercise did not necessarily imply lower skill. Lower scores simply implied a different path toward mastery.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAmerican Journal of Audiology;2022
dc.subjectAudiologyen_US
dc.subjectClinical competenceen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectStudentsen_US
dc.titleExamining audiology students' clinical collaboration skills when using virtual audiology cases aided with no collaboration, live collaboration, and virtual collaborationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© 2022 The Authorsen_US


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