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dc.contributor.authorXiong, Yingzi
dc.contributor.authorLei, Quan
dc.contributor.authorCalabrèse, Aurélie
dc.contributor.authorLegge, Gordon E.
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-12T08:54:28Z
dc.date.available2021-08-12T08:54:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-05
dc.identifier.citationXiong, Y. -., Lei, Q., Calabrèse, A., & Legge, G. E. (2021). Simulating visibility and reading performance in low vision. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 15 doi:10.3389/fnins.2021.671121en_US
dc.identifier.issn1662-4548
dc.identifier.issn1662-453X
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2021.671121
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/21674
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2021 Xiong, Lei, Calabrèse and Legge. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Low vision reduces text visibility and causes difficulties in reading. A valid low-vision simulation could be used to evaluate the accessibility of digital text for readers with low vision. We examined the validity of a digital simulation for replicating the text visibility and reading performance of low-vision individuals. Methods: Low-vision visibility was modeled with contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) with parameters to represent reduced acuity and contrast sensitivity. Digital filtering incorporating these CSFs were applied to digital versions of the Lighthouse Letter Acuity Chart and the Pelli-Robson Contrast Sensitivity Chart. Reading performance (reading acuity, critical print size, and maximum reading speed) was assessed with filtered versions of the MNREAD reading acuity Chart. Thirty-six normally sighted young adults completed chart testing under normal and simulated low-vision conditions. Fifty-eight low-vision subjects (thirty with macular pathology and twenty-eight with non-macular pathology) and fifteen normally sighted older subjects completed chart testing with their habitual viewing. We hypothesized that the performance of the normally sighted young adults under simulated low-vision conditions would match the corresponding performance of actual low-vision subjects. Results: When simulating low-vision conditions with visual acuity better than 1.50 logMAR (Snellen 20/630) and contrast sensitivity better than 0.15 log unit, the simulation adequately reduced the acuity and contrast sensitivity in normally sighted young subjects to the desired low-vision levels. When performing the MNREAD test with simulated low vision, the normally sighted young adults had faster maximum reading speed than both the Non-macular and Macular groups, by an average of 0.07 and 0.12 log word per minute, respectively. However, they adequately replicated the reading acuity as well as the critical print size, up to 2.00 logMAR of both low-vision groups. Conclusion: A low-vision simulation based on clinical measures of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity can provide good estimates of reading performance and the accessibility of digital text for a broad range of low-vision conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01 EY002934 to GEL; 1K99EY030145-01A1 to Y-ZX). Y-ZX was also supported by a fellowship from Envision Research Institute during the preparation of the manuscript.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Neuroscience;Vol. 15
dc.subjectReadingen_US
dc.subjectLow visionen_US
dc.subjectText visibilityen_US
dc.subjectVisual acuityen_US
dc.subjectContrast sensitivityen_US
dc.titleSimulating visibility and reading performance in low visionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© 2021 Xiong, Lei, Calabrèse and Legge. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US


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