Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKulick, Danielle
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:58:13Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:58:13Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationKulick, Danielle. 2019. Monkey see... what? Evidence for ecological and social selection in the evolution of primate color vision -- Lambda Alpha Journal, v.49, p.1-17
dc.identifier.issn0047-3928
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/20043
dc.description.abstractVision allows us to perceive our world and gain information on our surroundings. It is an ancient trait that has evolved many times in the animal kingdom and has taken many shapes and forms in different organisms - from simple light detection in single-celled organisms to the extensive multi-chromatic vision of mantis shrimp which detects 16 spectral types, 12 of which are linked to color perception (Vorobyev 2004). The term 'chromatic vision' refers to the ability to perceive colors due to varying peak sensitivities of photopigments in the eye to certain spectral wavelengths of light, thus determining which colors are perceived and differentiated between.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University. Department of Anthropology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAJ;v.49
dc.subjectChromatic
dc.subjectDiet
dc.subjectOptics
dc.subjectPhylogenetic
dc.titleMonkey see... what? Evidence for ecological and social selection in the evolution of primate color vision
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderCopyright by Lambda Alpha Journal, 2019


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record