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dc.contributor.authorMauersberg, Carolina
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:15:46Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:15:46Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationMauersberg, Carolina. 2018. The mobilization of Indigenous movements in post-colonial Latin America: Applications of theories of globalization and identity, space and place -- Lambda Alpha Journal, v.48, p.20-26
dc.identifier.issn0047-3928
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/20035
dc.description.abstractGlobalization has come to shape our world drastically in the twentieth century, and this era of modernity has also shifted traditional anthropological notions and discourse on the subject. More specifically, postmodern anthropology has begun to examine how globalization relates to and reconstructs concepts of identity, space, and place all under the movement away from traditional notions of culture. In understanding these concepts and transformative relationships, I utilize Gupta and Ferguson (1992) and Tsing (2005) for their postmodern perspectives. Gupta and Ferguson (1992) provide theories of rethinking notions of space, place, and identity; Tsing (2005) uses ethnography to illustrate how these concepts relate to culture under globalist forces. I apply these theorists to indigenous peoples' movements and mobilization in post-colonial Latin America. Latin America's history of colonization demonstrates how this region has received forces of globalization long before there was an actual term for the process. The paper then moves to examine how indigenous groups mobilize from transnational and national forces. I begin with a literature review on globalization, following with a focus on Gupta and Ferguson and Tsing's perspectives. I then discuss indigenous groups and mobilization in Latin America to illustrate transnational and national forces and utilize Bolivia to examine how identity leads to the creation of indigenous movements with a literature review of Otero (2004) and Nash (2001). I then apply Gupta & Ferguson and Tsing's theories to culminate the paper to discussing the connections to previously mentioned movements in Bolivia.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University. Department of Anthropology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAJ;v.48
dc.subjectColonization
dc.subjectGlobalization
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectIndigenous
dc.subjectMulticulturalism
dc.titleThe mobilization of Indigenous movements in post-colonial Latin America: Applications of theories of globalization and identity, space and place
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderCopyright by Lambda Alpha Journal, 2018


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