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dc.contributor.authorTodd, Mollie
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T17:24:18Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T17:24:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationTodd, Mollie. 2017. Analysis on the health and socio-cultural effects of female genital mutilation -- Lambda Alpha Journal, v.47, p.82-90
dc.identifier.issn0047-3928
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/20028
dc.description.abstractAccording to the World Health Organization, over 125 million girls and women alive today have undergone the practice of female genital circumcision (FGC)n. It has also been condemned by the United Nations General Assembly as "irreparable and irresponsible abuse," a sentiment echoed by many other human rights organizations like UNICEF and Equality Now. This practice has been referred to as female genital mutilation (FGM) or female genital cutting and is the act of removing various parts of the vagina for non-medical reasons. There are various methods of female genital cutting practiced around the world, mostly in Africa and the Middle East. FGM holds profound cultural meaning that varies by society and is founded in deep rooted traditions dating back to ancient times. This operation also causes several physical and psychological traumas to the women that have undergone the procedure. Whether considered to be an abomination or a vital part of tradition, the physical and mental properties of female genital circumcision create visible effects on the status of women in societies where it is performed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University. Department of Anthropology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAJ;v.47
dc.subjectActivism
dc.subjectCulture
dc.subjectRite of passage
dc.subjectTradition
dc.titleAnalysis on the health and socio-cultural effects of female genital mutilation
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderCopyright by Lambda Alpha Journal, 2017


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