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dc.contributor.authorLonge, Simone
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T15:35:44Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T15:35:44Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLonge, Simone. 2016. Sex estimation in forensic anthropology using the radius, femur, And scapula -- Lambda Alpha Journal, v.46, p.82-99
dc.identifier.issn0047-3928
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/20016
dc.description.abstractAccording to the American Board of Forensic Anthropology, "forensic anthropologists apply standard scientific techniques developed in physical anthropology to analyze human remains, and to aid in the detection of crime" (ABFA, 2010). Furthermore, forensic anthropology today is defined as "the scientific discipline that focuses on the life, the death, and the post life history of a specific individual, as reflected primarily in their skeletal remains and the physical and forensic context in which they are emplaced" (Dirkmaat et al., 47). Forensic anthropologists are responsible for a number of duties including skeletal trauma analysis, forensic taphonomy, and forensic archaeology. It is important to note that forensic anthropologists only work with human remains that are of both modem and of forensic significance (Tersigni-Tarrant and Shirley, 2013). For example, a forensic anthropologist would not be interested in working with ancient remains, as law enforcement would have no use for them.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University. Department of Anthropology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAJ;v.46
dc.subjectBiological
dc.subjectHuman remains
dc.subjectInvestigation
dc.subjectLower appendages
dc.subjectUpper appendages
dc.titleSex estimation in forensic anthropology using the radius, femur, And scapula
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderCopyright by Lambda Alpha Journal, 2016


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