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dc.contributor.authorOkwori, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBehfarnia, Ali
dc.contributor.authorEslami, Ali
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-04T02:00:49Z
dc.date.available2020-06-04T02:00:49Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-07
dc.identifier.citationM. Okwori, A. Behfarnia and A. Eslami, "Towards Microscale NFC-Enabled IoT Sensors: Physical and MAC Layer Design Analysis," in IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 88076-88084, 2020en_US
dc.identifier.issn2169-3536
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2020.2993205
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/17682
dc.descriptionOpen access. Under a Creative Commons License.en_US
dc.description.abstractMicroscale sensors provide critical solutions in diverse fields, ranging from measurement, automation, and control in industrial, agricultural, and biomedical applications. However, their development is limited by many requirements and challenges, such as efficient powering and the selection of suitable wireless communication technologies. A number of wireless communication technologies have been deployed in these sensors, including terahertz (Thz) radio frequency and ultrasound. Designing sensors in micro-scale imposes challenges for any communication technique deployed. This paper investigates the use of magnetic induction-based backscatter communication in a microscale sensor. The aim here is to provide both physical and media access control (MAC) layer design analysis for a microscale mote that is powered inductively and communicates with a reader using backscattering. Magnetic induction-based communication and powering are demonstrated via analysis and simulation for the mote. Then, low-power modulation, error-correction coding, and suitable low-power MAC schemes with evidence of feasible implementation in microscale are explored. Results of the performance analysis indicate that the proposed design achieves communication at a range of at least a few centimeters (5–6 cm) with an acceptable bit error rate (BER). Finally, MAC layer analysis reveals the optimum number of motes to be deployed for various read delays and transmission rates.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation under Grant OIA-1656006, and in part by the State of Kansas through the Kansas Board of Regents.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherIEEEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIEEE Access;v.8
dc.subjectMicroscale moteen_US
dc.subjectNear-field communicationen_US
dc.subjectIoT sensoren_US
dc.subjectLow-power modulationen_US
dc.subjectResource-constrained MACen_US
dc.titleTowards microscale NFC-enabled IoT Sensors: Physical and MAC layer design analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© 2013 IEEEen_US


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