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dc.contributor.authorExley, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorClarkson, Elizabeth P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-03T15:16:38Z
dc.date.available2020-06-03T15:16:38Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-08
dc.identifier.citationExley, C., Clarkson, E. Aluminium in human brain tissue from donors without neurodegenerative disease: A comparison with Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and autism. Sci Rep 10, 7770 (2020)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-64734-6
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/17678
dc.description© 2020, The Author(s). Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
dc.description.abstractA burgeoning number of studies are demonstrating aluminium in human brain tissue. While research has both quantified and imaged aluminium in human brain tissue in neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disease there are few similar data for brain tissue from non-neurologically impaired donors. We have used microwave assisted acid digestion and transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry to measure aluminium in twenty brains from donors without recognisable neurodegenerative disease. The aluminium content of 191 tissue samples was invariably low with over 80% of tissues having an aluminium content below 1.0 μg/g dry weight of tissue. The data for these control tissues were compared with data (measured using identical procedures) for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease, familial Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorder and multiple sclerosis. Detailed statistical analyses showed that aluminium was significantly increased in each of these disease groups compared to control tissues. We have confirmed previous conclusions that the aluminium content of brain tissue in Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorder and multiple sclerosis is significantly elevated. Further research is required to understand the role played by high levels of aluminium in the aetiology of human neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disease.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScientific Reports;v.10:no.1
dc.subjectNeurological disordersen_US
dc.subjectRisk factorsen_US
dc.titleAluminium in human brain tissue from donors without neurodegenerative disease: A comparison with Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and autismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© 2020, Springer Natureen_US


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