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dc.contributor.advisorClark, C. Brendan
dc.contributor.advisorSchroeder, Ryan W.
dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Phillip K.
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Karen A.
dc.contributor.authorSayers, Courtney
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Charles A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-10T21:55:09Z
dc.date.available2020-05-10T21:55:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-01
dc.identifier.citationMartinez, K. A., Sayers, C., Hayes, C. A. 2020. Invalid performance validity test but normal cognitive test performances, What does it mean? -- In Proceedings: 16th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p.49
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/17610
dc.descriptionPresented to the 16th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held online, Wichita State University, May 1, 2020.
dc.descriptionResearch completed in the Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Kansas of Medicine
dc.description.abstractWhile use of performance validity tests (PVTs) has become a standard of practice in neuropsychology, there are varying opinions regarding how to interpret cognitive test data, especially 'average' range data, if PVTs are failed. This study examined whether 'average' scores underrepresent functioning when PVTs are failed. Participants, randomly assigned to either a simulated malingering group (n=50) instructed to mildly suppress test performances or a best-effort/control group (n=50), completed the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) and Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM). Groups were not significantly different in age, education, or predicted IQ, but simulators performed significantly worse than controls on both the TOMM and CVLT-II short delay free recall (p<.05). Of simulators who failed the TOMM, 36% scored no worse than average (>25th percentile) and 73% scored no worse than low average (>10th percentile) on the CVLT-II. Given that simulators were instructed to suppress their cognitive performances and they scored worse than controls on the TOMM and CVLT-II, it is apparent their CVLT-II test performances were indeed suppressed despite generally being no worse than low average. These results indicate 'normal' cognitive test scores cannot be interpreted as accurately reflecting an individual's cognitive capabilities when obtained in the presence of failed PVTs.
dc.description.sponsorshipGraduate School, Academic Affairs, University Libraries
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASP
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv. 16
dc.titleInvalid performance validity test but normal cognitive test performances, What does it mean?
dc.typeAbstract
dc.rights.holderWichita State University


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