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dc.contributor.authorAchterberg, Jeanne
dc.contributor.authorLawlis, G. Frank
dc.contributor.authorSimonton, O. Carl (Oscar Carl)
dc.contributor.authorSimonton, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-20T20:26:09Z
dc.date.available2020-04-20T20:26:09Z
dc.date.issued1977
dc.identifier.citationAchterberg, J., Lawlis, G. F., Simonton, O. C., Matthews-Simonton, S. (1977). Psychological Factors and Blood Chemistries as Disease Outcome Predictors for Cancer Patients. Multivariate Experimental Clinical Research, 3(3), 107-122.
dc.identifier.issn0147-3964
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/17422
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between blood chemistries and psychological variables was studied in a population of cancer patients, the majority of whom had been diagnosed with incurable disease. An intensive batter of psychodiagnostics was administered (including MMPI, BEM Sex Role Inventory, FIRO-B, IMAGE-CA, POMS), was blood analyses (CBC, LDH, Alkaline Phosphatase, Cortisol, Cholesterol, FFA) were conducted. Various criterion variables (i.e., median life expectancy, disease and rehabilitation status) were included in the analyses. Initially, blood chemistries were clustered according to common variance via factor analysis and the factors were used to predict present and follow-up disease status. Psychological variables were utilized to predict respective variances within the blood chemistries. Psychological variables were then factor analyzed and utilized to determine wheter disease processes were related. The results of the analysis yield at least three basic conclusions: (1) Blood chemistries tend to reflect ongoing or concurrent disease state; (2) there is a statistical relationship between psychological variables and blood chemistries; and (3) psychological factors are predictive of subsequent disease status. However, these relationships are multidimensional and too complex to be considered either causative or reactive at this time. The results are impressive in that blood chemistries offer information only about the current state of the disease, whereas the psychological variables offer future insights.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University, Department of Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMultivariate Experimental Clinical Research
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.3 no.3
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectBlood chemistry
dc.titlePsychological factors and blood chemistries as disease outcome predictors for cancer patients
dc.typeArticle


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