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dc.contributor.authorLee, Yeon-Shim
dc.contributor.authorRoh, Soonhee
dc.contributor.authorMoon, Heehvul
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kyoung Hag
dc.contributor.authorMcKinley, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorLaPlante, Kathy
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-15T15:37:38Z
dc.date.available2020-04-15T15:37:38Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-05
dc.identifier.citationYeon-Shim Lee, Soonhee Roh, Heehyul Moon, Kyoung Hag Lee, Catherine McKinley & Kathy LaPlante (2020) Andersen’s Behavioral Model to Identify Correlates of Breast Cancer Screening Behaviors among Indigenous Women, Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 17:1, 117-135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2019.1650316
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/17362
dc.description© Authors. An open access journal. PMC is a repository of content from two sources: journals that overall have met NLM’s standards for PMC; and author manuscripts deposited in compliance with the public access policy of NIH or other collaborating funders.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined predictive models of utilization of mammograms among Indigenous women adapting Andersen’s behavioral model. Using a sample of 285 Indigenous women residing in South Dakota, nested logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess predisposing (age and marital status), need (personal and family cancer history), and enabling factors (education, monthly household income, mammogram screening awareness, breast cancer knowledge, self-rated health, and cultural practice to breast cancer screening). Results indicated that only 55.5% of participants reported having had a breast cancer screening within the past 2 years. After controlling for predisposing and need factors, higher education, greater awareness of mammogram, and higher utilization of traditional Native American approaches were significant predictors of mammogram uptake. The results provide important implications for intervention strategies aimed at improving breast cancer screening and service use among Indigenous women.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of South Dakota Seed Grants at the School of Health Sciences. Dr. Soonhee Roh (Principal Investigator) acknowledges Dr. Robin Miskimins for her mentoring on a Seed Grant at the School of Health Sciences of the University of South Dakota. This study was supported, in part, by a San Francisco State University Faculty Grant to Dr. Yeon-Shim Lee. This work was supported, in part, by Award K12HD043451 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health (Krousel-Wood-PI; Catherine McKinley (formerly Burnette)-Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) Scholar). Supported, in part, by U54 GM104940 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health, which funds the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science Center.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Evidence-Based Social Work;v.17;no.1
dc.subjectIndigenous womenen_US
dc.subjectBreast cancer screeningen_US
dc.subjectCancer awarenessen_US
dc.subjectMammogramen_US
dc.titleAndersen's behavioral model to identify correlates of breast cancer screening behaviors among indigenous womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© Authorsen_US


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