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dc.contributor.authorMulcahy, Ellyn R.
dc.contributor.authorBuchheit, Carla
dc.contributor.authorMax, Elyse
dc.contributor.authorHawley, Suzanne R.
dc.contributor.authorJames, Aimee S.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-03T14:25:07Z
dc.date.available2019-10-03T14:25:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-23
dc.identifier.citationMulcahy, Ellyn R.; Buchheit, Carla; Max, Elyse; Hawley, Suzanne R.; James, Aimee S. 2019. Collaborative health education for Somali Bantu refugee women in Kansas City. BMC Research Notes, vol. 12:no.1:art. no. 616en_US
dc.identifier.issn1756-0500
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4649-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/16733
dc.description© 2019 The Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To partner with and understand the health of Somali Bantu refugee women, small group sessions were designed and conducted using a community-based collaborative action research (CBCAR) approach. Health topics identified by this community were presented in 42 sessions with eleven women. Follow-up individual interviews with the women were used to ask questions about health experiences and plan for future health education. The objective of this qualitative study was to provide refugee women with knowledge to help them adjust to new health challenges in the United States, and to share personal narratives in a safe environment. Results: The process of sharing health information with the women resulted in a collaborative exchange of culture and community. Individual interviews allowed women to voice their opinions outside of the influence of their community elders. CBCAR is an effective tool to involve refugee communities, and other populations small in number, in addressing their unique health challenges. Results from this study demonstrated that small group sessions and a CBCAR approach can be effective in sharing knowledge within small communities of refugee women. Findings from the study will assist in the future planning of health education programs for refugee women and their families in this community.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBMC Research Notes;v.12:no.1
dc.subjectCultural competenceen_US
dc.subjectInterventionsen_US
dc.subjectParticipatory action researchen_US
dc.subjectQualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectRefugeesen_US
dc.subjectWomen’s healthen_US
dc.subjectFamily healthen_US
dc.titleCollaborative health education for Somali Bantu refugee women in Kansas Cityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© 2019 The Author(s)en_US


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