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dc.contributor.authorUnruh, Susan
dc.contributor.authorMcKellar, Nancy A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-15T17:33:10Z
dc.date.available2019-05-15T17:33:10Z
dc.date.issued2013-04
dc.identifier.citationUnruh, Susan; Mckellar, Nancy A. 2013. Evolution, not revolution: school psychologists' changing practices in determining specific learning disabilities. Psychology in the Schools, v.50 no.4 pp.353-365en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-3085
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000315448400003
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pits.21678
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/5681
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/16260
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe profession of school psychology has been impacted by the response to intervention (RTI) model in various ways. RTI data are being used to make decisions regarding academic and behavioral interventions and to make eligibility determinations in comprehensive evaluations conducted by multidisciplinary teams. A survey of almost 400 school psychologist practitioners reveals a changing landscape in terms of school psychologists' methods of determining eligibility for specific learning disabilities (SLD) in RTI site and non-RTI site schools. The survey also brings to light differences between numbers of initial evaluations and levels of challenge and job satisfaction. Implications of these changes and future directions for research are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPsychology in the Schools;v.50 no.4
dc.titleEvolution, not revolution: school psychologists' changing practices in determining specific learning disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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