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dc.contributor.authorBillingham, Chase M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-10T20:35:45Z
dc.date.available2019-05-10T20:35:45Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-03
dc.identifier.citationChase M. Billingham (2019) The fight for America’s schools: Grassroots organizing in education, edited by Barbara Ferman, Journal of Urban Affairs, 41:3, 417-419en_US
dc.identifier.issn0735-2166
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000465180000015
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/07352166.2018.1507210
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/16240
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen urban renewal threatened her West Village neighborhood, Jacobs marshaled the discourse of sociability in opposition. Her defense of diversity, density, and mixed-use districts arose from her journalism, her knowledge of East Harlem, and her study of ecology. Ecology gave her the language and the credibility to defend fragile city districts and to challenge as unscientific those who thought of slum clearance or highway construction as simple problems. In The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), Jacobs crafted what Herbert Gans called a “badly needed urban myth” (Gans, 1969, p. 30) for a society that underestimated the value of public experience.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Urban Affairs;v.41:no.3
dc.titleBook review: The fight for America's schools: grassroots organizing in educationen_US
dc.typeBook reviewen_US
dc.rights.holder© Taylor & Francisen_US


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