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dc.contributor.authorHawley, Suzanne R.
dc.contributor.authorCrimmings, Karen P.
dc.contributor.authorRivera-Newberry, Ivonne
dc.contributor.authorOrr, Shirley A.
dc.contributor.authorWalkner, Laurie M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-26T15:54:38Z
dc.date.available2019-04-26T15:54:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-03
dc.identifier.citationHawley, S. R., Crimmings, K. P., Rivera-Newberry, I., Orr, S. A., & Walkner, L. M. (2019). Capacity Building for Public Health: Participant-Guided Training. Health Promotion Practiceen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/16133
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractGrowth in the demand for public health services, along with limited funding, makes workforce collaboration and capacity building imperative. The faculty and staff of the Midwestern Public Health Training Center, with two Robert Wood Johnson Public Health Nurse Leaders, postulated that training could be more effective, and public health workers more effective in the field, if workers contributed to training format and content. The learning paradigm was tested on diabetes prevention and self-management programs. Public health professionals were surveyed on infrastructure, practices, roles, and gaps in diabetes-related services. Responses influenced the format and content of a one-day diabetes summit training program. Participants submitted evaluations immediately afterward. Eight months postsummit, participants were surveyed to self-assess behavioral changes attributed to the training. Using the Kirkpatrick model for evaluation, participants (n = 112) stated that the training met their expectations and that knowledge gained was consistent with stated training objectives. Qualitative postsummit survey results indicated that improvements in participants’ delivery of diabetes prevention services to the public could be attributed to the training they received at the summit. Results suggest that training about specific programs and practices, as well as facilitated sessions of collaboration, can yield individual and organizational change.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHealth Promotion Practice;2019
dc.subjectDiabetes preventionen_US
dc.subjectHealth educationen_US
dc.subjectHealth promotionen_US
dc.subjectKirkpatrick model for evaluationen_US
dc.subjectProcess evaluationen_US
dc.subjectProgram planning and evaluationen_US
dc.subjectPublic health leadershipen_US
dc.titleCapacity building for public health: participant-guided trainingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© 2019 Society for Public Health Educationen_US


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