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dc.contributor.advisorSnyder, James J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooker, Monica S.
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-16
dc.date.available2008-09-16
dc.date.copyright2007
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifier.otherd07013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/1475
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Wichita State University, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Dept. of Psychologyen
dc.description"August 2007."en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the relationship of family contextual risk factors to the occurrence of victimization of children by peers, as mediated by parental warmth and communication. Family risk factors were derived from parent reports of socio-economic status and family configuration. Parental warmth and communication was derived from observations of parent-child interactions. Victimization was estimated by observed rates at which children were victims of peer verbal and physical aggression at school. The contribution of family risk factors to victimization by peers was examined in an aggregated and disaggregated manner, and as moderated by gender. Neither family risk factors nor parental warmth and communication placed children at a greater risk of victimization. Family contextual risk was negatively associated with parent warmth and communication.en
dc.format.extentvii, 72 p.
dc.format.extent300006 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State Universityen
dc.subject.lcshElectronic dissertationsen
dc.titleThe role of the family in chronic victimization by peersen
dc.typeDissertationen


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  • Dissertations
    This collection includes Ph.D. dissertations completed at the Wichita State University Graduate School (Fall 2005 --)
  • LAS Theses and Dissertations
    Theses and dissertations completed at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Fall 2005 -)
  • PSY Theses and Dissertations
    This collection consists of theses and dissertations completed at the WSU Department of Psychology.

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