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dc.contributor.authorRicke, Audrey
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T15:57:47Z
dc.date.available2008-06-12T15:57:47Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationRicke, Audrey. 2006. Conceiving of Self: a case study of the Brazilian-Japanese. In: Lambda Alpha Journal, v.36, p.42-51en
dc.identifier.issn0047-3928
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/1453
dc.description.abstractHow the individual relates to society has been a central focus in cultural and personality studies within anthropology. The Brazilian-Japanese migration to Japan constitutes a unique situation in which to study societal influences on individuals. Before leaving Brazil, the Brazilian-Japanese predominately consider themselves to be Japanese, but once in Japan the culture in which the Brazilian-Japanese claim to share heritage with refuses to fully accept the Brazilian-Japanese’s concept of self. By attempting to understand the way in which the Brazilian-Japanese cope with this challenge, the application of George Herbert Mead’s theory of self which focuses on the interaction of individuals with the group in self formation, offers insights into how the Brazilian-Japanese “become” Brazilian.en
dc.format.extent78191 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State University. Department of Anthropologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAJen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.36en
dc.subjectBrazilian-Japaneseen
dc.subjectSelf-perceptionen
dc.subjectSocial perceptionen
dc.subjectImmigrationen
dc.subjectSocial groupsen
dc.titleConceiving of self: a case study of the Brazilian-Japaneseen
dc.typeArticleen


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