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dc.contributor.authorCarlson, Tara
dc.contributor.authorStrattman, Kathy H.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-05T17:05:38Z
dc.date.available2008-06-05T17:05:38Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-25
dc.identifier.citationCarlson, Tara, Strattman, Kathy , (2008) . Do babies increase vocabulary by viewing baby media? . In Proceedings: 4th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p.121-122en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/1389
dc.descriptionPaper presented to the 4th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 25, 2008.en
dc.descriptionResearch completed at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Health Professionsen
dc.description.abstractThe American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that children under two years of age not watch TV or other electronic screens; however, the number of videos targeted at this age group continues to increase. Marketers claim their products will increase vocabulary and cognitive abilities; however, there is a lack of empirical studies. Research on brain development indicates that babies learn best by having salient experiences and interacting with their caregivers (Gopnik, Meltzoff, & Kuhl, 1999). Because of the possibility that some positive language learning can occur due to media viewing, more research is needed in this area with a focus on very young children. There is an abundance of information available about the positive relationship between vocabulary and home literacy routines (Foy & Mann, 2003; Senechal, LeFevre, Thomas, & Daley, 1998; van Kleck, 2006). Research is needed comparing the increase in vocabulary that occurs as a result of viewing baby media with that of shared book reading. Twelve children (12-30 months) were assigned to one of three groups during this 4-week study. Each week, Group 1 watched a 10 minute segment of a DVD “edutainment” program targeted at this young age group. Group 2 parents read books to their child for the same amount of time as the DVD group. Books were the DVD companions and covered the same vocabulary terms as the DVD. Group 3 was considered the control group and only pre- and post-testing were completed with no books or DVDs introduced. Differences between weekly pre- and post-tests revealed greater overall gain by the group that was read books.en
dc.format.extent193730 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State University. Graduate School.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASPen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.4en
dc.titleDo babies increase vocabulary by viewing baby media?en
dc.typeConference paperen


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