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dc.contributor.authorProbst, Adam C.
dc.contributor.authorShaffer, Victoria A.
dc.contributor.authorLambdin, Charles Garett
dc.contributor.authorArkes, Hal R.
dc.contributor.authorMedow, Mitchel A.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-05T16:02:15Z
dc.date.available2008-06-05T16:02:15Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-25
dc.identifier.citationProbst, Adam C., Shaffer, Victoria A., Lambdin, Charles, Arkes, Hal R. , Medow, Mitchel A. (2008) . Ratings of physicians relying on experts versus physicians relying on decision aids . In Proceedings: 4th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p.91-92en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/1374
dc.descriptionPaper presented to the 4th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 25, 2008.en
dc.descriptionResearch completed at the Department of Psychology, Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciencesen
dc.description.abstractErrors in the field of medicine are costly, both in terms of monetary expenses and the cost of lives. Computerbased decision aids have been shown to decrease physician error. These decision aids decreased many types of errors, reduced hospital admissions and costs and fostered the implementation of evidence-based medicine. However, patients give lower ratings to physicians who use such aids on many variables (diagnostic ability, professionalism, overall satisfaction with exam). The current research attempts to ascertain whether patients are uncomfortable with the use of a computer in a humancentered field or the consultation of an outside source by a physician. Participants were asked to evaluate physicians in one of three scenarios: the physician makes an unaided diagnosis, the physician consults a human expert for a second opinion, or the physician uses a computer-based diagnostic aid to diagnose a patient. Two planned Man-Witney U tests showed that physicians who used the computer-based aid were given lower ratings on diagnostic ability, professionalism, and overall satisfaction compared to physicians making unaided diagnoses. Ratings of physician making unaided diagnosis were not significantly different from that of the physician who consulted human experts. We conclude that it is not the consultation of an outside source that patients find objectionable. However, the use of a computer in a human-centered field such as medicine is responsible for the derogated ratings of physicians.en
dc.format.extent183311 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State University. Graduate School.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASPen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.4en
dc.titleRatings of physicians relying on experts versus physicians relying on decision aidsen
dc.typeConference paperen


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