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dc.contributor.authorHenry, Robin
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T16:32:50Z
dc.date.available2017-04-12T16:32:50Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.citationHenry, R. (2017). “IN OUR IMAGE, ACCORDING TO OUR LIKENESS”: JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, JR. AND RECONSTRUCTING MANHOOD IN POST-LUDLOW COLORADO. The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 16(1), 24-43en_US
dc.identifier.issn1537-7814
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000394576800003
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S153778141600044X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/12929
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr.' s reactions to the Colorado Coal Wars resulted in the creation of the Employee Representation Plan, better known as the Rockefeller Plan. While labor historians identify the Rockefeller Plan as a dynamic shift in labor-management relations, this article focuses on the lesser studied portion of Rockefeller's reconstruction plan, his program of soft reform and its effect on the construction of masculinity in the industrial West. For Junior, restructuring the work environment and the relationship between management and labor left reconstruction incomplete, and thus vulnerable to future crises. Beginning in 1914, Rockefeller provided support for local and national social organizations to work throughout southern Colorado in order to impart middle-class values to his workers. He believed that reconstructing their social and cultural values-from language to sexual behavior-would remove any socialist influences, and create a better workforce. By applying this type of pressure, Junior helped create an environment that supported local anti-vice movements, and validated a growing belief that law enforcement and legislation could be used to curb vice. Following the deadly strike, Rockefeller's attempts to transform his public image and industrial workers not only have implications for labor history, but also social and gender histories, in particular the construction of masculinity in the American West.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era;v.16:no.1
dc.title"In our image, according to our likeness" : John D. Rockefeller, jr. and reconstructing manhood in post-Ludlow Coloradoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder© Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era 2017en_US


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