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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Sarah R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T19:03:03Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T19:03:03Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, Sarah R. 2017. Issues in measuring success in community-based Indigenous tourism: elites, kin groups, social capital, gender dynamics and income flows. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, vol. 25:no. 3:pp 433-449en_US
dc.identifier.issn0966-9582
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000396820800008
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2016.1217871
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/12917
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractTourism development is a key feature of the neoliberal economic development model. Through a mix of state and private investment, Indigenous communities in Mexico are encouraged to transform local cultural and environmental resources into tourist consumption sites. The process results in a shift toward reliance on tourism, in place of farming, leaving households with few alternative earning strategies amidst fluctuating tourist arrivals and income, confounding the relationship between tourism and sustainability and questioning the utility of tourism as a sustainable tool for development. This article analyses a communitybased Indigenous tourism project in a rural Maya village in Mexico's Yucatan, and discusses strategies employed at household level to navigate the arrival of tourism. Funding agencies assessed this project based on a triple bottom line metric that accounts for ecological health, financial sustainability, and its relationship to local social capital; however, these fail to account for differences between local and non-local conceptions of authenticity, indigeneity, and success. From a social perspective, the project has exacerbated existing tensions and has arguably widened the gap between the politically and economically powerful and less powerful, marginalized families in the community. Questions about policy, governance systems, and elite domination and kin group control are raised.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipChristine E. Bose and Edna Acosta Initiatives for Women grant (2009), the American Philosophical Society's Lewis and Clark Exploration Grant (2010), the Institute for Mesoamerican Studies' DeCormier Award (2010), and the David and Sally Jackman Endowment (2014).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Sustainable Tourism;v.25:no.3
dc.subjectIndigenous tourismen_US
dc.subjectCommunity-based tourism developmenten_US
dc.subjectMayaen_US
dc.subjectHousehold economic strategiesen_US
dc.titleIssues in measuring success in community-based Indigenous tourism: elites, kin groups, social capital, gender dynamics and income flowsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2017 Routledgeen_US


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