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dc.contributor.authorMa, Shufeng
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jie
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Richard C.
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorNguyen-Jahiel, Kim Thi
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Brian
dc.contributor.authorJadallah, May
dc.contributor.authorSun, Jingjing
dc.contributor.authorLin, Tzu-Jung
dc.contributor.authorScott, Theresa
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Yu-Li
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xin
dc.contributor.authorLatawiec, Beata
dc.contributor.authorGrabow, Kay
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T18:50:07Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T18:50:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationMa, Shufeng; Zhang, Jie; Anderson, Richard C.; Morris, Joshua; Kim Thi Nguyen-Jahiel; Miller, Brian; Jadallah, May; Sun, Jingjing; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Scott, Theresa; Hsu, Yu-Li; Zhang, Xin; Latawiec, Beata; Grabow, Kay. 2017. Children's productive use of academic vocabulary. Discourse Processes, vol. 54:no. 1:pp 40-61en_US
dc.identifier.issn0163-853X
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000394509100003
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0163853X.2016.1166889
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/12916
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractInstructional influences on productive use of academic vocabulary were investigated among 460 mostly African American and Latina/o fifth graders from 36 classrooms in eight public schools serving low-income families. Students received a 6-week unit on wolf management involving collaborative group work (CG) or direct instruction (DI). The big question that students tried to answer during the unit was whether a community should be permitted to destroy a pack of wolves. In an individual oral interview about an analogue to the wolf question, whether whaling should be allowed, both CG and DI students used more general and domain-specific academic vocabulary from the Wolf Unit than uninstructed control students. CG students used more general academic vocabulary in the whale interview than DI students, and this was mediated by the CG students' greater use of general academic vocabulary in classroom dialogue during the Wolf Unit. These results suggest that CG is an effective instructional approach to promote acquisition and productive use of academic vocabulary for children from underserved communities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, through grant R305A080347 to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscourse Processes;v.54:no.1
dc.subjectEnglish-language learnersen_US
dc.subjectSchool Englishen_US
dc.subjectMediation analysisen_US
dc.subjectLexical richnessen_US
dc.subjectMiddle schoolen_US
dc.subjectInstructionen_US
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_US
dc.subjectWordsen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectMetaanalysisen_US
dc.titleChildren's productive use of academic vocabularyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2017 Routledgeen_US


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