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dc.contributor.authorAbedin, Farhana
dc.contributor.authorAnwar, Md. Rajib
dc.contributor.authorAsmatulu, Ramazan
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-03T21:23:12Z
dc.date.available2017-01-03T21:23:12Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationAbedin, Farhana; Anwar, Md. Rajib; Asmatulu, Ramazan. 2016. Chapter 15 -- Risk assessments of Green Photo-active Nanomaterials. In: Green Photo-active Nanomaterials : Sustainable Energy and Environmental Remediation, vol. 42:pp 364-384en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78262-264-2
dc.identifier.issn1757-7039
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000388175900016
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1039/9781782622642-00364
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/12750
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractPhoto-active nanomaterials absorb sunlight and directly convert it into more useful form of energy (electricity). They are being increasingly used in commercial products, indicating that they may be one of the ways to address environmental concerns. However, exposure of these nanomaterials to humans, other terrestrial life, and aquatic life could have short-term and long-term adverse impacts on them. Transformation of these nanomaterials in the environment would play a vital role in the toxicity, transport, and fate of these nanomaterials in the environment. Human exposure to nanomaterials can occur during manufacturing, transportation, storage, and use of the consumer goods. As nanomaterials are taken up by plants and animals they may enter the food chain and lead to biomagnification, which can be potentially harmful for animals in the higher trophic levels and for humans. Here, we discuss toxicity studies of some photo-active nanomaterials conducted in the past, possible toxicity mechanisms, means of exposure, transformation, and transport to some extent. Factors that need to be considered to assess the environmental impacts of these nanomaterials are also discussed in detail.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGreen Photo-active Nanomaterials : Sustainable Energy and Environmental Remediation;v.42
dc.subjectTitanium-dioxide nanoparticlesen_US
dc.subjectCerium oxide nanoparticlesen_US
dc.subjectSemiconductor quantum dotsen_US
dc.subjectCultured beas-2b cellsen_US
dc.subjectWaste-water treatmenten_US
dc.subjectOxidative stressen_US
dc.subjectResearch strategiesen_US
dc.subjectSafety evaluationen_US
dc.subjectIn-vitroen_US
dc.subjectEngineered nanomaterialsen_US
dc.titleChapter 15 -- Risk assessments of Green Photo-active Nanomaterialsen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.rights.holder© Royal Society of Chemistry 2016en_US


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