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dc.contributor.authorMonroe, J. Grey
dc.contributor.authorMcGovern, Cullen
dc.contributor.authorLasky, Jesse R.
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Kelsi
dc.contributor.authorBeck, James B.
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, John K.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-25T23:12:47Z
dc.date.available2016-09-25T23:12:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.citationMonroe, J. G., McGovern, C., Lasky, J. R., Grogan, K., Beck, J. and McKay, J. K. (2016), Adaptation to warmer climates by parallel functional evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mol Ecol, 25: 3632–3644en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000380949700010
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.13711
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/12435
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe evolutionary processes and genetics underlying local adaptation at a specieswide level are largely unknown. Recent work has indicated that a frameshift mutation in a member of a family of transcription factors, C-repeat binding factors or CBFs, underlies local adaptation and freezing tolerance divergence between two European populations of Arabidopsis thaliana. To ask whether the specieswide evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis is consistent with local adaptation, we surveyed CBF variation from 477 wild accessions collected across the species' range. We found that CBF sequence variation is strongly associated with winter temperature variables. Looking specifically at the minimum temperature experienced during the coldest month, we found that Arabidopsis from warmer climates exhibit a significant excess of nonsynonymous polymorphisms in CBF genes and revealed a CBF haplotype network whose structure points to multiple independent transitions to warmer climates. We also identified a number of newly described mutations of significant functional effect in CBF genes, similar to the frameshift mutation previously indicated to be locally adaptive in Italy, and find that they are significantly associated with warm winters. Lastly, we uncover relationships between climate and the position of significant functional effect mutations between and within CBF paralogs, suggesting variation in adaptive function of different mutations. Cumulatively, these findings support the hypothesis that disruption of CBF gene function is adaptive in warmer climates, and illustrate how parallel evolution in a transcription factor can underlie adaptation to climate.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF grants DEB-1022196 and DEB-1556262 to JKM and USDA-NIFA National Needs Graduate Fellowship Program, Award no. 2014-38420-21801 to JGM.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMolecular Ecology;v.25:no.15
dc.subjectAdaptationen_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectC-repeat binding factoren_US
dc.subjectGene structure and functionen_US
dc.subjectLandscape geneticsen_US
dc.subjectMolecular evolutionen_US
dc.titleAdaptation to warmer climates by parallel functional evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis thalianaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 1999 - 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserveden_US


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