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dc.contributor.authorMorris, Nichole L.
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, C.
dc.contributor.authorThibault, K.
dc.contributor.authorChaparro, Alex
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-10T20:38:04Z
dc.date.available2016-02-10T20:38:04Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.citationMorris, N., Phillips, C., Thibault, K., & Chaparro, A. (2008). Sources of secondary task interference with driving: Executive processes or verbal and visuo-spatial rehearsal processes? Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 52(19), 1556-1559.
dc.identifier.otherdoi: 10.1177/154193120805201953
dc.identifier.urihttp://doi.org/fzdxzj
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/11789
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the effects of secondary working memory tasks that loaded either visuo-spatial working memory or verbal working memory (phonological loop) and which required either rehearsal or executive processes involving stimulus manipulation. The effects of the secondary tasks on driver look-out behavior and driving performance were assessed. Preliminary studies were conducted to select tasks that resulted in similar levels of accuracy and perceived difficulty across modalities (visuo-spatial, verbal, rehearse, and manipulate). Piloting and the preliminary studies were also used to evaluate different visual tasks and to select a visual task that could not be encoded verbally. Results of the study reveal that driving performance is significantly impaired while performing a secondary manipulation task than performing a rehearsal task of equivalent difficulty. The study finds that visuo-spatial and verbal secondary tasks produce the same level of interference with overall driving performance.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
dc.relation.ispartofseries52(19)
dc.titleSources of secondary task interference with driving: Executive processes or verbal and visuo-spatial rehearsal processes?
dc.typeConference paper
dc.rights.holderHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society, Inc.


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