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dc.contributor.authorArgyrisa, Young E. (Anna)
dc.contributor.authorXu, David Jingjun
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-31T23:05:19Z
dc.date.available2016-01-31T23:05:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-02
dc.identifier.citationArgyrisa, Young E. (Anna); Xu, David Jingjun. 2016. Enhancing self-efficacy for career development in Facebook. Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 55:pt. B, February 2016:pp 921–931en_US
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000367755500034
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.10.023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/11733
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe literature has two competing perspectives on Facebook: One claims positive effects of Facebook on individuals, while the other suggests detrimental effects. The contrasting perspectives are due to the technology-deterministic approach centering on Facebook "use" as opposed to non-use, neglecting the idiosyncrasies of members and the roles of their context. Accordingly, this study focuses on current college student members and enhancement of their self-efficacy for career development in Facebook, given college students' loyalty to Facebook and their increasing financial uncertainties in the US. We posit that Facebook provides two affordances (i.e., affordance of virtual people watching and affordance of garnering social support), which in turn increase chances of two important sources of self-efficacy i.e., gaining vicarious experience and social persuasions. An online survey with 260 college student Facebook members was conducted; the results of data analyses corroborated our hypotheses. These findings identify the unique affordances of Facebook for self-efficacy development, thereby expanding the social cognitive theory by demonstrating that technology affordances translate into effective sources of self-efficacy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesComputers in Human Behavior;v.55:pt.B
dc.subjectFacebooken_US
dc.subjectCollege studentsen_US
dc.subjectTechnology affordanceen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectOnline surveyen_US
dc.titleEnhancing self-efficacy for career development in Facebooken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US


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