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dc.contributor.authorBawaneh, Khaled
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T14:38:36Z
dc.date.available2016-01-04T14:38:36Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.citationBawaneh, K., Overcash, M., and Twomey, J. (2014). "Assessing the Utilization of a Manufacturing Plant Floor as Part of Overhead Energy." J. Energy Eng., 10.1061/(ASCE)EY.1943-7897.0000186, 05014001en_US
dc.identifier.issn0733-9402
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000365120400001
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)EY.1943-7897.0000186
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/11705
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the relationship between manufacturing plant areas and the plant's overhead energy was investigated and analyzed. The physical information about five industrial facilities, which included blueprints, plant layout, plant area, and machine configuration, was collected and in-plant measurements were made. The goal of this research is to measure, in actual manufacturing plants, the area distributions and their relationship to the basic machine area footprint (where the product manufacturing occurs) across a wide range of machine types. A six-categorization system (A to F) was developed for the different plant areas and can be used easily by other researchers. A linear relationship of decreasing total plant area (A to F) with decreasing machine size (A) was found. Thus, the allocated total plant area (TPA) is determined as A to F and can be estimated for a single machine operating at a manufacturing rate of x products or workpieces per hour. The nonprocess energy, then, is TPAx (30 W/m(2) or 3.6 kJ/hm(2)) for manufacturing building nonprocess energy intensity. Then, total nonprocess energy for the manufacturing machine (kJ/h) divided by the production rate x products/h gives the nonprocess energy per product (kJ/product). This research has contributed further to the life cycle of products by estimating the nonprocess energy per product, which then can be added to the direct process manufacturing energy to give a total energy per product.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBloomfield Foundation Industrial Sustainability Initiative at Wichita State University (www.wichita.edu/sustainability) has been vital to this research. Additional support from the Department of Energy (Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions, DE-EE0004167).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Energy Engineering;v.41:no.4
dc.subjectIndustrial building energy consumptionen_US
dc.subjectLife cycle informationen_US
dc.subjectManufacturing process areaen_US
dc.subjectOverhead energyen_US
dc.subjectMachine areaen_US
dc.titleAssessing the utilization of a manufacturing plant floor as part of overhead energyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 1996-2015, American Society of Civil Engineersen_US


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