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dc.contributor.authorShrivastava, Amber
dc.contributor.authorOvercash, Michael
dc.contributor.authorPfefferkorn, Frank E.
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-04T19:00:15Z
dc.date.available2015-06-04T19:00:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifier.citationShrivastava, Amber; Overcash, Michael; Pfefferkorn, Frank E. 2015. Prediction of unit process life cycle inventory (UPLCI) energy consumption in a friction stir weld. Journal of Manufacturing Processes, vol. 18, April 2015:pp 46–54en_US
dc.identifier.issn1526-6125
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000354583700004
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2014.10.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/11288
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study is to determine a method of quantifying the energy consumption in friction stir welding (FSW). Qualitatively, it has long been known that FSW uses less energy than fusion welding processes because the average FSW weld temperature does not exceed the solidus temperature. However, tools and data to quantitatively determine the energy consumption in FSW have been missing. The power consumption as a function of time was measured during FSW of 5.2-mm-deep welds in 6061-T6 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys on a 3-axis CNC mill. The energy consumption is divided into four parts: idle energy and standby energy related to the machine being used as well as plunge energy and FSW energy related to creating the joint. Equations for calculating each of the energy components and the total energy consumption are presented. The concept of specific weld energy is presented as an intrinsic material property that can be used to estimate the FSW power if the weld cross-section and weld speed are known. A method of estimating the weld cross-section based on the FSW tool geometry is presented. It is found that for these two aluminum alloys the specific weld energy decreases significantly with increased weld speed, however, it can be treated as independent of spindle rotation rate. The FSW process/machine is identified as low tare and it is acknowledged that the strategies to reduce total energy consumption may be different than those used for metal cutting.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport of this work by Wichita State University, the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) Technology Development RA, the Wisconsin Innovation & Economic Development Research (IEDR) Program and the National Science Foundation through grant CMMI-1332738.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Manufacturing Processes;v.18
dc.subjectFriction stir weldingen_US
dc.subjectAluminumen_US
dc.subjectEnergyen_US
dc.subjectSpecific weld energyen_US
dc.subjectUnit process life cycle inventoryen_US
dc.subjectUPLCIen_US
dc.titlePrediction of unit process life cycle inventory (UPLCI) energy consumption in a friction stir welden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2014 The Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


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