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dc.contributor.authorHuprich, Steven K.
dc.contributor.authorPaggeot, Amy V.
dc.contributor.authorSamuel, Douglas B.
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-27T01:09:03Z
dc.date.available2015-01-27T01:09:03Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-02
dc.identifier.citationHuprich, Steven K.; Paggeot, Amy V.; Samuel, Douglas B. 2015. Comparing the personality disorder interview for DSM-IV (PDI-IV) and SCID-II borderline personality disorder scales: an item-response theory analysis. Journal of Personality Assessment, vol. 97:no. 1:pp 13-21en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3891
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000347042200003
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223891.2014.946606
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/11055
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractOne-hundred sixty-nine psychiatric outpatients and 171undergraduate students were assessed with the Personality Disorder Interview-IV (PDI-IV; Widiger, Mangine, Corbitt, Ellis, & Thomas, 1995) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II disorders (SCID-II; First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, & Benjamin, 1997) for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Eighty individuals met PDI-IV BPD criteria, whereas 34 met SCID-II BPD criteria. Dimensional ratings of both measures were highly intercorrelated (rs = .78, .75), and item-level interrater reliability fell in the good to excellent range. An item-response theory analysis was performed to investigate whether properties of the items from each interview could help understand these differences. The limited agreement seemed to be explained by differences in the response options across the two interviews. We found that suicidal behavior was among the most discriminating criteria on both instruments, whereas dissociation and difficulty controlling anger had the 2 lowest alpha parameter values. Finally, those meeting BPD criteria on both interviews had higher levels of anxiety, depression, and more impairments in object relations than those meeting criteria on just the PDI-IV. These findings suggest that the choice of measure has a notable effect on the obtained diagnostic prevalence and the level of BPD severity that is detected.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Personality Assessment;v.97:no.1
dc.subjectCriteriaen_US
dc.titleComparing the personality disorder interview for DSM-IV (PDI-IV) and SCID-II borderline personality disorder scales: an item-response theory analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2015 Routledge


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