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dc.contributor.authorChand, Masud
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T19:32:25Z
dc.date.available2014-10-06T19:32:25Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.citationChand, Masud. 2014. Diaspora identity, acculturation policy and FDI: the Indian diaspora in Canada and the United States. Asian Business & Management, vol. 13:no. 4:pp 283-308 (September 2014)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-4782
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000341279300001
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1057/abm.2014.6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/10757
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractWe use the Indian diaspora in Canada and the United States to explore the effect that host-country acculturation policies can have on the attitudes that immigrants hold toward the home and host countries, and how these attitudes can affect the flow of foreign direct investment (FDI) from host to home countries. Our results reveal that Indo-Canadians feel more at home in Canada than Indian-Americans do in the United States, and that they are less likely to invest in India. This indicates that attitudes toward both the home and host country are important factors affecting diaspora FDI, and that a host country's acculturation mode significantly affects a diaspora's attitude toward both the home and host countries.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAsian Business & Management;v.13:no.4
dc.subjectIndian diasporaen_US
dc.subjectAcculturationen_US
dc.subjectFDIen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectThe United Statesen_US
dc.titleDiaspora identity, acculturation policy and FDI: the Indian diaspora in Canada and the United Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2014, Macmillan Publishers Ltd.


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