Journal of Management and Engineering Integration, v.12 no.1

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    Journal of Management & Engineering Integration, v.12 no.1 (Summer)
    (Association for Industry, Engineering and Management Systems (AIEMS), 2019-06) Association for Industry, Engineering and Management Systems (AIEMS)
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    Big data, ethics, and social impact theory: A conceptual framework
    (Association for Industry, Engineering and Management Systems (AIEMS), 2019-06) White, Gwen; Ariyachandra, Thilini; White, David
    Decisions made using big data, impact ethical issues like privacy, security, ownership, and decision making. In addition, those same decisions can have a positive or negative social impact. This paper proposes a framework that explains how decisions made using big data impact ethics and social impact theory. A broad literature review explored how big data and ethics can have a social impact on society. The proposed framework of big data, ethics and social impact is illustrated through three examples. Insurance companies manipulate big data to impact sales. The Center for Disease Control examines big data to determine the location of the next outbreak. Companies analyze big data in predictive analytics to increase marketing or determine a new trend. It was found that these uses of big data directly affect ethics which has a positive or negative social impact. Simple decisions can change the outcome for one or millions.
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    Performance enhancing drug usage: The influence of adverse health effects and public embarrassment
    (Association for Industry, Engineering and Management Systems (AIEMS), 2019-06) Cudmore, B. Andrew; Jensen, Sherry
    This research examines the impact of adverse health effects and public embarrassment as deterrents to the use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs). Deterrence theory suggests that potential PED users execute a cost-benefit analysis before engaging in illicit drug use; any increase in perceived costs reduces the likelihood of drug use. In accordance with the deterrence theory, this study finds that social costs (public embarrassment) have a negative impact on attitudes toward PEDs. However, potential health costs, even extreme ones, do not deter amateur athletes from considering PEDs. Rationale is offered for why fear of social disapproval has a larger impact than adverse health outcomes on attitudes of potential PED users. Results provide guidance for the development of marketing communications designed to deter amateur athletes from considering PEDs.
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    Review of earned value management (EVM) methodology, its limitations, and applicable extensions.
    (Association for Industry, Engineering and Management Systems (AIEMS), 2019-06) Nizam, Anisulrahman; Elshannaway, Ahmad
    Department of Defense (DoD) Instruction 5000.02 requires an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) compliant with ANSI/EIA-748 for all DoD cost or incentive contracts valued at or greater than $20M. Earned Value Management (EVM) integrates cost, schedule, and time to draw conclusions about current project status as well as make projections for future project status. Though EVM has been widely adopted on many projects, there are clear limitations indicated in the literature which ultimately inhibit the ability of EVM to become universally accepted as a best practice across all industries. In response, researchers have developed extensions such as Earned Schedule Management (ESM), Earned Duration Management (EDM), and Customer Earned Value (CEV). This paper addresses the evolution, limitations, and new extensions of EVM.
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    Lean in education: Mistake-proofing methods used by teachers at a magnet high school.
    (Association for Industry, Engineering and Management Systems (AIEMS), 2019-06) Keyser, Robert S.
    High school teachers, like most people, make mistakes on a regular basis, but they have also developed mistake-proofing methods to negate the impact of these errors. There is currently no published research in the field of identifying common mistakes and employing mistake-proofing techniques among teachers in a high school environment. A qualitative, descriptive study describes the most common mistakes made by teachers at a magnet high school in the metro-Atlanta area as well as the mistake-proofing methods used to mitigate these mistakes. An online survey was distributed to all faculty at the high school and 30 responses were received within the four-week deadline. The most common error reported related to the grading of assignments. Teachers also struggled with personal time management, as well as classroom time management. Results indicate six common types of mistakes and their respective mistake-proofing methods that are discussed in this paper.