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dc.contributor.advisorSchommer-Aikins, Marlene
dc.contributor.authorBird, Tera L.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T16:39:04Z
dc.date.available2012-11-16T16:39:04Z
dc.date.copyright2012en
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.othert12004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/5376
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Ed.)--Wichita State University, College of Education, Dept. of Counseling, Educational and School Psychologyen_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to examine the epistemological beliefs of Native Americans in order to gain a better understanding of their beliefs about the nature of knowledge and learning. Fifteen adults were interviewed to obtain information related to their beliefs about the source, justification, stability, and structure of knowledge as well as their beliefs about the speed of learning, ability to learn, and their degree of trust in authority. Results confirmed that women attributed a larger percentage of the ability to learn from inborn characteristics, while men attributed a larger percentage of the ability to learn from learning how to learn. The results also confirmed that older participants were more likely to believe that the average person learns moderately fast, participants that disliked math were more likely to believe that the average person learns moderately fast, and participants that liked math were more likely to believe that the average person learns fast.en_US
dc.format.extentviii, 73 p.en
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWichita State Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Tera L. Bird, 2012. All rights reserveden
dc.subject.lcshElectronic dissertationsen
dc.titleExamining Native American epistemological beliefsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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