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Counter stories of African American males who attained a doctoral degree at a predominantly white institution

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dc.contributor.advisor Patterson, Jean A.
dc.contributor.author Callis, Larry D.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-13T22:13:21Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-13T22:13:21Z
dc.date.copyright 2012
dc.date.issued 2012-05
dc.identifier.other d12002
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10057/5353
dc.description Thesis (Ed.D)--Wichita State University, College of Education, Dept. of Educational Leadership en_US
dc.description.abstract This study examined the counter stories of African American Males, ages 36-61, who successfully earned a doctoral degree at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). Critical inquiry was used to examine the worldviews of African American Male (AAM) doctoral students and their doctoral experience through the theoretical lenses of Critical Race Theory, Stereotype Threat, and Racial Identity. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews that gathered data through critical inquiries about these experiences from a post-degree perspective. African American Male doctoral degree attainment is a vital function of student success within a privileged educational paradigm. Results of the study demonstrated that AAM doctoral degree achievement is complex by his perceptions of racism, racial identity, and the issues of diversity at Predominantly White Institutions. en_US
dc.format.extent xiii, 210 p. en
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Wichita State University en_US
dc.rights Copyright Larry D. Callis, 2012. All rights reserved en
dc.subject.lcsh Electronic dissertations en
dc.title Counter stories of African American males who attained a doctoral degree at a predominantly white institution en_US
dc.type Dissertation

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