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dc.contributor.authorPile, Debra
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-13T18:21:45Z
dc.date.available2012-09-13T18:21:45Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-06
dc.identifier.citationDebra Pile, Does Using an Asthma Prompting Form Improve Asthma Care in a Pediatric Office?, Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Volume 28, Issue 3, May–June 2013, Pages 275–281, ISSN 0882-5963, 10.1016/j.pedn.2012.08.002.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0882-5963
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2012.08.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/5272
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractAn asthma exacerbation can be a life-threatening experience. This project tested the effectiveness of using a prompting form to improve childhood asthma care. Thirty randomly selected charts without a prompt form in a pediatric practice were compared for differences with thirty randomly selected charts with a completed prompting form. The number of medications reviewed (p = .001) and the frequency of refills written (p = .024) were significantly higher in the prompt group. Education was higher (p = .000) and triggers were more frequently discussed in the prompt group. The use of a prompting form facilitates discussion and improves preventive asthma care.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Pediatric Nursing;
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.28, Issue 3
dc.subjectAsthmaen_US
dc.titleDoes using an asthma prompting form improve asthma care in a pediatric office?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2013, Elsevier


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