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dc.contributor.advisorArmstrong, Richard N.
dc.contributor.authorNze, Samuel Onyenachi
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-09T20:47:47Z
dc.date.available2010-12-09T20:47:47Z
dc.date.copyright2010en
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.othert10027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/3318
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Wichita State University, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The Elliott School of Communication.en
dc.description.abstractThe thesis, entitled Barack Obama and World Peace: A Rhetorical Inquiry, is a qualitative research paper that appraises President Obama's commitment to global peace, through a thematic analysis of a cross section of his speeches. Against the background of Mr. Obama's receipt of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, the thesis evaluates in five chapters Mr. Obama's merit as an icon of global peace by seeking a possible rhetorical vision of peace emerging from a cross section of his speeches, and consequently establishing a possible justification for his receipt of the Nobel Prize, using the Fantasy-theme method of rhetorical criticism. The thesis concludes that there is a rhetorical vision of peace emerging from a cross section of President Obama's speeches, and that he may consequently be called an icon of global peace, deserving of having won the Nobel Prize.en
dc.format.extentvi, 189 p.en
dc.format.extent859838 bytes
dc.format.extent1843 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State Universityen
dc.rightsCopyright Samuel Onyenachi Nze, 2010. All rights reserveden
dc.subject.lcshElectronic dissertationsen
dc.titleBarack Obama and world peace, a rhetorical inquiryen
dc.typeThesisen


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  • Master's Theses [973]
    This collection includes Master's theses completed at the Wichita State University Graduate School (Fall 2005 --)
  • LAS Theses and Dissertations [440]
    Theses and dissertations completed at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Fall 2005 -)
  • ESC Theses [34]
    Master's theses completed at the Elliott School of Communication (Fall 2005 --)

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