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dc.contributor.advisorGibson, Kay L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSimkins, John Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-03T18:54:39Z
dc.date.available2010-05-03T18:54:39Z
dc.date.issued2009-05en_US
dc.identifier.othert09014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/2435
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Ed.)--Wichita State University, College of Education, Dept. of Curriculum and Instructionen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the question of whether using recorded texts in conjunction with written texts might improve gifted students’ reading comprehension. Participants were thirteen gifted readers from two elementary schools, in grades 1 to 5. Participants alternated reading texts at their reading level with, and without, the aid of audio recordings. Immediately following the reading of the text, participants took a short comprehension test. Participants completed pre- and post- treatment surveys to determine to measure their attitudes towards listening versus reading and how they may have changed during the study. Five participants scored higher using the Read / Listen treatment; four did equally well using either treatment; and four scored better on the Read Only treatment. Participants who scored better on the Read / Listen treatment scored at least a full letter grade higher than with the Read Only treatment.en_US
dc.format.extentx, 41 p.en_US
dc.format.extent296184 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWichita State Universityen_US
dc.titleStudy in the use of audiobooks for reading in gifted studentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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