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Physician Assistant and Physician Assistant student exposure to and perceptions of pharmaceutical representatives in the clinical setting: A Pilot study at Wichita State University

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dc.contributor.author Swanson, Matthew A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Caputo, Cathryn en_US
dc.contributor.author Quigley, Timothy en_US
dc.contributor.author Ablah, Elizabeth en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-19T21:47:39Z
dc.date.available 2009-11-19T21:47:39Z
dc.date.issued 2009-05-01 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Swanson, Matthew A., Caputo, Cathryn, Quigley, Timothy and Elizabeth Ablah (2009). Physician Assistant and Physician Assistant Student Exposure to and Perceptions of Pharmaceutical Representatives in the Clinical Setting: A Pilot Study at Wichita State University . In Proceedings: 5th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 164-165 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10057/2256
dc.description Paper presented to the 5th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, May 1, 2009. en_US
dc.description Research completed at the Department of Physician Assistant, College of Health Professions en_US
dc.description.abstract A physician assistant (PA) exercises considerable autonomy in diagnosing and treating illnesses, along with the responsibility of prescribing medication. In 2006, PAs transmitted approximately 286 million prescriptions.1 Pharmaceutical companies thus market to physicians, medical students, PAs, and PA students to promote the use of their products. The purpose of this study was to fill a literature gap by conducting a survey that assessed WSU PA and PA student exposure to and perception of pharmaceutical representatives. Subjects completed a 45 question survey based upon a previous study among medical students at UCLA.2 All respondents verified having at least one type of interaction with the pharmaceutical industry. A majority of respondents reported being less likely to be influenced by marketing strategies than would their colleagues, a finding similar to previous studies conducted on physicians and medical students. PAs and PA students are exposed to the same influences as their MD counterparts. This implies that interventions used for MDs should also be applied to PAs. en_US
dc.format.extent 115064 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Wichita State University. Graduate School en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries GRASP en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries v.5 en_US
dc.title Physician Assistant and Physician Assistant student exposure to and perceptions of pharmaceutical representatives in the clinical setting: A Pilot study at Wichita State University en_US
dc.type Conference paper en_US

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