Show simple item record

dc.contributorWichita State University. School of Community Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.authorVance, B. M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-13T16:44:49Z
dc.date.available2012-03-13T16:44:49Z
dc.date.issued1989-06en_US
dc.identifier2662754en_US
dc.identifier8108948en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe American journal of forensic medicine and pathology. 1989 Jun; 10(2): 174-80.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-7910en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4811
dc.descriptionThe full text of this article is not available in SOAR.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work is based on the lecture given by Dr. Bernard M. Vance, then Assistant Chief Medical Examiner of New York, to the Homicide Squad Detectives of New York City on November 2, 1933, at the New York Police Academy. He entitled his presentation "Death, simulation of death and suspicion of death." Dr. Vance was an outstanding member of the New York Office's Forensic Pathology Group and was known for his colorful renditions of the scene and autopsy findings in medicolegal cases.en_US
dc.format.extent174-80en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAm J Forensic Med Patholen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectHistorical Articleen_US
dc.subject.meshDeathen_US
dc.subject.meshForensic Medicine/historyen_US
dc.subject.meshHistory, 20th Centuryen_US
dc.subject.meshNew York Cityen_US
dc.titleSigns of death as considered by Dr. B.M. Vance in a lecture fifty years agoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © Lippincott-Raven Publishersen_US


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record