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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Physical Therapyen_US
dc.contributor.authorReiman, Michael P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeintner, Ashley M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoehner, Amber L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Cori N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Jessica R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarter, John W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-12T19:12:51Z
dc.date.available2012-03-12T19:12:51Z
dc.date.issued2010-12en_US
dc.identifier21088550en_US
dc.identifier9415084en_US
dc.identifier00124278-201012000-00025en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association. 2010 Dec; 24(12): 3387-95.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181f159bden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4800
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined lower extremity power performance, using the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test, after a dynamic warm-up with (resisted) and without (nonresisted) a weighted vest. Sixteen (n = 16) high school male football players, ages 14-18 years, participated in 2 randomly ordered testing sessions. One session involved performing the team's standard dynamic warm-up while wearing a vest weighted at 5% of the individual athlete's body weight before performing 3 trials of the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test. The second session involved performing the same dynamic warm-up without wearing a weighted vest before performing 3 trials of the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test. The warm-up performed by the athletes consisted of various lower extremity dynamic movements over a 5-minute period. No significant difference was found in power performance between the resisted and nonresisted dynamic warm-up protocols (p > 0.05). The use of a dynamic warm-up with a vest weighted at 5% of the athlete's body weight was not advantageous for increasing lower extremity power output in this study. The results of this study suggest that resisted dynamic warm-up protocols may not augment the production of power performance in high school football players.en_US
dc.format.extent3387-95en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Strength Cond Resen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshClothingen_US
dc.subject.meshFootball/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLower Extremity/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMovement/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Stretching Exercisesen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Education and Training/methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWeight-Bearing/physiologyen_US
dc.titleEffects of dynamic warm-up with and without a weighted vest on lower extremity power performance of high school male athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Associationen_US


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