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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Counseling, Educational and School Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBohn-Gettler, Catherine M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPellegrini, Anthony D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDupuis, Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Meghanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHou, Yuefengen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoseth, Caryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSolberg, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-15T21:30:08Z
dc.date.available2012-02-15T21:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2010-05en_US
dc.identifier20476822en_US
dc.identifier8309850en_US
dc.identifier2010-09316-012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of comparative psychology (Washington, D.C. : 1983). 2010 May; 124(2): 219-28.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1939-2087en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9940en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0018083en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4464
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this 2-year longitudinal study, we hypothesized that sex of the human child (Homo sapiens), differences in physical activity, and time of the year would interact to influence preschool children's sex segregation. We also hypothesized that activity would differentially relate to peer rejection for boys and girls. Consistent with the first hypothesis, high-activity girls started off as the most integrated group but became more segregated with time, whereas high-activity boys remained the most segregated group across the duration of the study. The second hypothesis was also supported: For girls only, activity was significantly related to peer rejection during Year 1 only, the time when high-activity girls also interacted frequently with boys. Results are discussed in terms of sexual selection theory and gender boundary violations.en_US
dc.format.extent219-28en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Comparative Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Comp Psycholen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPeer Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshPrejudiceen_US
dc.subject.meshRejection (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSexual Behavioren_US
dc.titleA longitudinal study of preschool children's (Homo sapiens) sex segregationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2010 American Psychological Associationen_US


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